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Getting Real about Goal Setting

Without goals, and plans to reach them, you are like a ship that has set sail with no destination.” — Fitzhugh Dodson

 

At the end of every fiscal year, do you find that you are just short of the goals that you so neatly created months ago? Or do you find that your business team took a left turn and went way off course and have not revisited the goals since the last time they created them? These are two extremely common problems when creating goals for your business.

Every business owner knows that creating and sticking to goals are what drive a business. Without goals, it’s difficult to identify ways you can grow, develop, and move toward continued success. Sometimes, however, when it comes to goal setting, it is easier to take a look at the mistakes that are common rather than the other way around.

Let’s take a look at a common personal goal that thousands of us make every New Year’s Eve and see how we can make it better. Many of us make it a goal or resolution to lose weight every year. While this is a wonderful goal that more of us should attempt, there is something wrong with the goal. Do you know what the mistake is?

The goal of losing weight is too broad. Most business owners make similar mistakes. Goals should be: achievable, measurable, and specific. Let’s rewrite the weight loss goal and see how we can improve it.

How about we change it to, “I will lose 15 pounds within three months.” Or, “I will lose at least two inches off my waist.” Or, “I will be down a dress size,” in the same time frame. Each of these is measurable, achievable, and specific.

Business owners should do the same thing when creating sales goals or any other kind of goal depending upon your field or industry. Each goal should be narrow in scope, have a time frame, and have a way to measure whether the goal has been reached.

Many business leaders use the SMART business model for goal setting. What are your biggest mistakes when setting goals? Do you get overwhelmed with the scope of a project? Do you make the goals too broad? There are a million mistakes that can be made. If you need help, you may want to attend one of our seminars on Setting and Achieving Transformative Goals.

 

BLS Provider CPR (1-day Initial or Renewal Course, multiple sessions available)

(Initial or Renewal Course based on the 2015 AHA Guidelines)
Basic Life Support (BLS) is the foundation for saving lives after cardiac arrest. This course teaches both single-rescuer and team basic life support skills for application in both in-facility and prehospital settings. This course is designed for healthcare professionals and other personnel who need to know how to perform CPR and other basic cardiovascular life support skills.

In addition, BLS training can be appropriate for first responders, such as police officers and firefighters, as well as for laypeople whose work brings them into contact with members of the public, such as school, fitness center, or hotel and restaurant employees.

Students must pass a written exam and skills test in order to qualify for a BLS Course Completion Card.
Upon successful completion of this course, students will receive a completion cad valid for 2 years.

Conveniently scheduled on Saturday, please choose the session that works best for you.

REGISTER NOW!

Corporate Mentors Programs

According to Chronus, corporate mentoring is on the rise with 71 percent of Fortune 500 companies offering professional mentoring programs to their employees. Successful companies, large and small, use mentoring to tackle complex human resource challenges such as increasing employee retention, enabling company succession plans, and improving workforce productivity. So, what is mentoring and how can it be successfully used in the workplace?

What Exactly Is a Mentor?
A mentor is a more experienced (typically older or ,at the very least, more experienced) professional in your field who offers career guidance, advice and assistance from a real world point-of-view. Mentoring at work is an effective way of helping people to progress further in their chosen careers. It is a partnership between two people, the mentor and the mentee.

How Can Mentors Be Used in the Workplace?

  • Mentors can push mentees to hone and learn new skills that are needed for future roles. These roles could be within the area of career development, leadership development or assist with knowledge transfer.
  • Mentors can be a cheerleader of sorts. They can praise great work and progress and give excellent feedback on progress that has yet to be made.
  • Mentors can be a life-long friendship that can guide and offer advice along the way.
  • Mentors can not only explain what it takes to be the best or make it to the top in a certain field but can also show this through actions and work habits.
  • Mentors can, many times, allow their mentee to shadow them and learn by doing an experiential way. The best way to learn is by doing it yourself.
  • Reverse mentoring can also be a helpful tool in showing older professionals some of the new tricks of the trade, which may be new strategies or technology know-how.

In today’s competitive business world the key to advancement, employee retention and the spread of great ideas in the workplace is mentoring. This powerful process can help the emotional and intellectual growth of employees and engage them in a way otherwise not possible.

Building a Strong Staff

2676859-A-group-of-people-team-up-in-a-pyramid-to-celebrate-success-teamwork-cooperation-winning-etc--Stock-Vector“People are definitely a company’s greatest asset. It doesn’t make any difference whether the product is cars or cosmetics. A company is only as good as the people it keeps.” Mary Kay Ash – Mary Kay Cosmetics

It’s no secret that high-performing companies have high-performing teams.  How can business leaders ensure that they are building a strong staff and team to make their business successful?  According to Insight Assessment Online, building a strong staff to help your company consists of three key components:

  1. Hire Smart – Don’t hire someone who is not highly skilled for the position you need filled.  Ask yourself several questions before hiring:  Does this person have the ability to expand or build on the skill set they already possess? Does this person have the self-motivation needed to be a contributing member to the team? Is the person a thinker and problem solver or do they require hand holding? Can you envision this person meshing with the rest of the team with a personality that fits with the rest of the company and ultimately your brand image?  Does this person have skills that compliment the skills you already have in the office or do they have skills that fill a void in your team?
  2. Identify strengths and talents of team members – This may take time and some level of trial and error but place team members in positions where they can perform the best.  Once you have identified each staff member’s strength or weakness, build off the positives through professional development, conferences and incentives that will make them more productive and invested workers. Position your top performers in positions that will make them shine.  Match people with certain talents with others to build on their own natural strengths.
  3. Foster a positive environment – Encourage team members to be creative and work productively by valuing the great job they are doing.  Be connected and communicative with employes so they know you are aware of their hard work.  Be sure that everyone knows the ultimate goal and has clear responsibilities.  A lack of clarity and purpose can confuse and frustrate teams.
  4. Be Flexible – Not all employees are the same.  Realize that home and family life can be complicated.  Team members will be more invested and possibly more productive if they worry less about what is going on at home.  Does your company have a flex scheduling, telecommuting or other incentive policy that could make for happier team members?  Building a strong team can sometimes mean understanding the needs of the team both at work and at home.