Become a Member

The Difference Between Recruitment and Talent Acquisition

The terms “talent acquisition” and “recruitment” are often confused as meaning the same thing, but this is not the case. There are key differences between the two, differences with which you should familiarize yourself if you’re looking to hire the most qualified candidates for specific positions within your company. For starters, recruitment means that you’re looking to hire someone, dare I say anyone, in order to fill a vacancy. Talent acquisition, on the other hand, is the process of strategically looking for specialists, leaders, future executives, or other qualified professionals for a specific position within the company. Let’s delve into both and take a look at which one is better depending on the industry and why:

  • Recruitment – Again, recruitment is the process by which you look to fill vacant positions quickly and without much regard for the candidate’s’ particular specialties, if defined. Recruiting may be seen as reactive, meaning that a position recently opened up and it must be filled.

 

  • Talent Acquisition – As previously stated, talent acquisition is all about actively searching for the most qualified candidate to hire for a specific position. This strategy is common among niche industries such as, medical, technology, legal, and even translation services. Kathleen Quinn Votaw, Founder and CEO of the HR consulting firm, TalenTrust, says that, “The areas with the greatest skills shortages are those that most need a talent strategy.” Typically, if you’re looking to hire people for a long-term position, you should aim for talent acquisition, so as to lower a potentially high turnover rate, which is a possible effect of recruiting less-qualified candidates.

 

 

Talent acquisition is becoming increasingly more popular, and usually requires some marketing strategies to make the position known to specific, potential candidates. As niche industries continue to grow and populate as preferred career paths, hiring managers within are simultaneously scouting out candidates with the best talent, who are most qualified, and who will both ameliorate, as well as benefit from working for, the company. Define whom you’re looking to hire and for which positions, and either recruit or acquire talent accordingly.

BLS Provider CPR (1-day Initial or Renewal Course, multiple sessions available)

(Initial or Renewal Course based on the 2015 AHA Guidelines)
Basic Life Support (BLS) is the foundation for saving lives after cardiac arrest. This course teaches both single-rescuer and team basic life support skills for application in both in-facility and prehospital settings. This course is designed for healthcare professionals and other personnel who need to know how to perform CPR and other basic cardiovascular life support skills.

In addition, BLS training can be appropriate for first responders, such as police officers and firefighters, as well as for laypeople whose work brings them into contact with members of the public, such as school, fitness center, or hotel and restaurant employees.

Students must pass a written exam and skills test in order to qualify for a BLS Course Completion Card.
Upon successful completion of this course, students will receive a completion cad valid for 2 years.

Conveniently scheduled on Saturday, please choose the session that works best for you.

REGISTER NOW!

Job Descriptions for Management

 

When hiring a member of your business team, there is probably some sort of onboarding process that involves a Human Resources component where an employee handbook is reviewed, or at least a job description is discussed. A job description is a document listing the tasks, duties, and responsibilities of a specific job. Seems pretty straightforward right?

This fairly simple document seems like a win-win situation. Employees need to know what the job they are applying for entails, including specific duties, education needed, as well as necessary skills and training for the job. Employers use a job description as not only part of the hiring process but also in the evaluation and management of employees. Let’s examine the components and lasting implications of a job description.

 

Components of a Good Job Description:

  • A summary of the job position as well as a detailed list of duties and responsibilities.
  • The name of a supervisor to report to or where to have questions answered.
  • Evaluation criteria that matches with the job responsibilities. The part that answers the question, “how will the person be evaluated at each review?”
  • A description of how the job fits into the larger scheme of the company.
  • Physical surroundings such as work station or area designated for the employee.
  • Compensation details should also be included in this section.

Implications of the Job Description:

Having up-to-date, accurate and professionally written job descriptions is critical to an organization’s ability to attract qualified candidates, orient and train employees, establish job performance standards, develop compensation programs, conduct performance reviews, set goals, and meet legal requirements. Some of the ways that a job description can help a company run smoothly and accomplish it’s short and long term goals include:

 

  • Identifying training and education gaps for the employee so that all gaps can be covered.
  • Motivate employees to move up the corporate ladder.
  • Develop an equitable salary structure.
  • Evaluate job performance and manage bottom performers as well as retain top performers.
  • Protect the company from legal sanctions or employee suits.
  • Evaluate employee productivity and performance.
  • And, finally, job descriptions can help recruit the best employees for your company.